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1.1: Faculty Resources Overview - Biology

1.1: Faculty Resources Overview - Biology



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We’ve seen overwhelming demand for high quality, openly-licensed course materials, including supplemental resources to enrich teaching and learning and to make life easier for instructors. To support this need, we’ve developed and curated faculty resources to use with this course.

Free and Open Supplemental Materials

On the following pages, you will find supplemental resources that are freely available to use with the interactive learning materials for this course. Since these resources are openly licensed, you may use them as is or adapt them to your needs.

Additional Faculty Resources

Additional supplemental resources, learning tools, and support services are available to faculty who adopt Waymaker, OHM, or Candela courses with paid support from Lumen Learning. For many courses, these include some combination of summative assessments, answer keys, solutions manuals, or other materials shared only with authorized instructors in order to protect academic integrity.

Click here to learn more about additional instructor tools and resources available to faculty who adopt Lumen-supported courseware. Information about pricing and payment options is available on this page. Lumen’s low-cost support fees replace the cost of expensive textbooks and may be paid by students or by the institution directly.

Continuously Improving Learning Materials

Are you interested in collaborating with us to make these course materials better? We use learning data to identify where content improvements are needed, and then we invite faculty and subject matter experts to work with us developing continuous improvements aimed at increasing learning.

Learn more from this blog post, or sign up here to join our continuous improvement mailing list and stay up to date about upcoming OER hackathons and other continuous improvement activities.


Faculty Research Interests

The faculty of Biology provides the most important set of resources for a student considering graduate school. First and foremost, as a student in our program, one of us will eventually be your major advisor, providing guidance on developing your research and career advice. Please check out our web pages listed under the “Graduate Faculty” tab to learn more about us and contact us if you are interested.

Your training will also be enhanced by interacting with other faculty members who may have overlapping interests. Biology has a diverse set of research foci, and you can learn more about these interest groups by following the tab labelled “Interest Groups”. Interactions with researchers in Medicine and Agriculture, among others also can enhance your experiences, so check out our colleagues in those colleges as well.

Finally, there will also be plenty of opportunities to interact with a diverse set of researchers and educators across the breadth of Biology. Your training includes experience at understanding other research besides your own, integrating new ideas and techniques into your own research, and developing skills at educating others. Faculty members who do not directly train students contribute greatly to the suite of experiences you will have as a student in our program. To learn more about the full faculty in the department, click the “Faculty” button in the banner at the top of the page.


Biology Student Resources

Students are strongly encouraged to complete an internship (for credit) as part of their major program. Internships give students invaluable opportunities to gain experience in areas in which they might later like to pursue a career. Internships are usually arranged by the students themselves with the help of a faculty member and are supervised by the faculty member and an off-campus supervisor.

Biology students have undertaken internships at numerous cooperating agencies over the past several years, including (among others):

  • Merck and Company
  • The Nature Conservancy
  • The Philadelphia Zoo
  • Reading Hospital
  • Lehigh Valley Hospital
  • Phila. College of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Crystella Physical Therapy and Fitness
  • Tri-County Physical Therapy
  • Patt Veterinary Hospital
  • Hawk Mountain Sanctuary
  • The Wildlands Conservancy
  • Trexler-Lehigh Game Preserve
  • Lehigh WildCare
  • The Berks County Conservancy
  • The New Jersey State Aquarium
Biology Department Student Clubs

The Biology Department is associated with several student clubs including the following:


Program Schedule

Dates: Thursday-Friday October 8-9, 2020, 8:00AM-3:00PM PDT

Preliminary schedule for this year’s workshop

Day 1

8-8:50 am - Welcome and orientation. Short statement and Q&A about Stanford Biology and the three tracks with the Director of Graduate Studies (DGS) and representatives from each track

9-9:50 am - Focused workshops (student selected)

10-10:50 am - Breakout session for EcoEvo/Hopkins and CMOB about discipline specific considerations on initial contact with faculty and how the application/matching process works

11-11:50 pm - Students work one-on-one with graduate students on their CV

12-12:50 pm - Virtual social lunch/coffee break out rooms with graduate students

1-1:50 pm - Finances and grad school Q&A

2-2:50 pm - Guided tour of the Stanford graduate application, highlighting sections that are especially important in review

Day 2

8-8:50 am - Q&A with graduate students about life at Stanford, application process, and general grad school experiences

9-9:50 am - Focused workshops (student selected)

10-10:50 am - Students receive one-on-one feedback on personal statement section of their applications

11-11:50 pm - Breakout session for informal discussions with faculty from different areas (TBD based on student interests).

12-12:50 pm - Virtual housing/lab tours and lunch/coffee

1-1:50 pm - Practice interviews with faculty and feedback

Possible topics for focused workshops include:

Identifying and leveraging your key strengths as a graduate student

Mentoring up: How to evaluate a potential mentor and their commitment to your success

Dealing with imposter syndrome

Protecting your time and success in graduate school

Wellness, mental health, self compassion and work life balance in graduate school


Comparative structural analysis of human Na1.1 and Na1.5 reveals mutational hotspots for sodium channelopathies.

<p>Among the nine subtypes of human voltage-gated sodium (Na) channels, the brain and cardiac isoforms, Na1.1 and Na1.5, each carry more than 400 missense mutations respectively associated with epilepsy and cardiac disorders. High-resolution structures are required for structure-function relationship dissection of the disease variants. We report the cryo-EM structures of the full-length human Na1.1-β4 complex at 3.3 Å resolution here and the Na1.5-E1784K variant in the accompanying paper. Up to 341 and 261 disease-related missense mutations in Na1.1 and Na1.5, respectively, are resolved. Comparative structural analysis reveals several clusters of disease mutations that are common to both Na1.1 and Na1.5. Among these, the majority of mutations on the extracellular loops above the pore domain and the supporting segments for the selectivity filter may impair structural integrity, while those on the pore domain and the voltage-sensing domains mostly interfere with electromechanical coupling and fast inactivation. Our systematic structural delineation of these mutations provides important insight into their pathogenic mechanism, which will facilitate the development of precise therapeutic interventions against various sodium channelopathies.</p>


Additional supplemental resources, learning tools, and support services are available to faculty who adopt Waymaker, OHM, or Candela courses with paid support from Lumen Learning. For many courses, these include some combination of summative assessments, answer keys, solutions manuals, or other materials shared only with authorized instructors in order to protect academic integrity.

Click here to learn more about additional instructor tools and resources available to faculty who adopt Lumen-supported courseware. Information about pricing and payment options is available on this page . Lumen’s low-cost support fees replace the cost of expensive textbooks and may be paid by students or by the institution directly.


Overview

The Biology Department is a diverse group of progressive and energetic individuals dedicated to instilling in our students a love of biology and the knowledge and skills they will need to excel in their pursuits after Bates College.

Faculty and AI’s work closely with students in inquiry-based laboratories in both core and elective courses. (L) Prof. Ryan Bavis, (C) Assoc. Prof. Larissa Williams, (R) Carolyn Lawson AI.

The Biology Department is comprised of nine tenure-track faculty, four visiting faculty, and five academic and technical support staff members. Our faculty teach a wide range of courses and support a range of undergraduate research opportunities including Honors thesis, thesis, independent study, and small Research and Seminar courses. The support staff includes two full time Assistants in Instruction (AI’s, or lab instructors), half-time contributions from an AI in the Chemistry, a biology technician who manages the stockroom and departmental accounting, and a technician who oversees laboratory and building-wide safety, research animal care, and the greenhouse facilities.

New Faculty for Fall 2019: The department welcomes two new faculty members: Microbiologist Dr. Lori Banks has joined our department in a tenure track Assistant Professor position and molecular biologist Dr. Allison Moloney joins us a Visiting Assistant Professor We look forward to their contributions to our program as scholars, teachers, and mentors.

Faculty on sabbatical leave: Dr. Ryan Bavis AY 2019-20 | Dr. Larissa Williams AY 2019-20

Carnegie Science main entrance.

The Biology Department occupies the 3rd, 4th, and 5th floors of the Carnegie Science Building at 44 Campus Avenue, on the south side of the Bates College campus.

Contact

Sylvia Deschaine, Carnegie Science Academic Administrative Assistant, CSH Coordinator


Overview

One of six academic divisions at Caltech, Biology and Biological Engineering (BBE) focuses on advancing investigations of and expanding knowledge about the nature of life- from a single molecule to an entire organism. Through interdisciplinary programs of study and research, faculty and students address complex questions related to how living things evolve, develop, and function, and then use their findings to engineer innovative biological systems as well as medicines and other therapies.

Today's investigators and students add to a rich history that includes the work of individuals credited with laying the groundwork for modern biology with major advances in genetics, molecular biology, biotechnology, and neurobiology. BBE has trained many of the world's most eminent biologists.

With laboratory and classroom facilities in seven buildings on Caltech's campus, BBE researchers and students also benefit from extensive access to state-of-the-art laboratory equipment and facilities as well as a marine laboratory located within 50 miles of campus.

The division includes more than 50 faculty research laboratories—labs headed by renowned leaders in their fields, including:


FACULTY SPOTLIGHT

“One of the amazing things about being at Nicholls is that our biology students get hands on experience working in our local ecosystems through their courses and research. Students get to learn and work in Louisiana’s swamps, wetlands, bayous, estuaries and coastal ecosystems. Through research collaborations, Nicholls biology students have conducted research in the Atchafalaya Basin to examine how poor water quality is affecting wild crawfish populations. This student-led research will impact our local ecosystems and region as projects to improve water quality and ecosystem health in the Atchafalaya Basin move forward.”


Continuously Improving Learning Materials

Are you interested in collaborating with us to make these course materials better? We use learning data to identify where content improvements are needed, and then we invite faculty and subject matter experts to work with us developing continuous improvements aimed at increasing learning.

Learn more from this blog post, or sign up here to join our continuous improvement mailing list and stay up to date about upcoming OER hackathons and other continuous improvement activities.


Watch the video: Intro to Molecular Biology 2016 IB Biology (August 2022).