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White flower with spikes around base?

White flower with spikes around base?



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What type of flower is this? Location : India


This does in fact look like the flower to the cactus species Selenicereus grandiflorus.

Source: Wikimedia

According to "Indigenous Cactus biodiversity: A viable genetic resource to fulfill multiform needs under rainfed ecosystems"1, this plant is found in India:

Different varieties of the cactus are found in India which has immense ethnomedicinal value (Table 1). Selenicereus grandiflorus (with large sweet-scented night flowering flowers) and the Opuntia stricta are found in the wasteland as hedge plants

See here for a good image, and see here for a cool gif of one of these flowers blooming!


1. Rai, M., Singh, R.K., Sharma, P.C. and Singh, L.K., 2011. Indigenous Cactus biodiversity: A viable genetic resource to fulfill multiform needs under rainfed ecosystems.


This could be Selenicereus grandiflorus, the Queen of the Night.


Shrubs and Bushes Identification

Have you become interested in gardening? Then here are some handy tips and various common shrubs chart, that will help in shrubs and bushes identification.

Have you become interested in gardening? Then here are some handy tips and various common shrubs chart, that will help in shrubs and bushes identification…

Different shrubs and bushes are used for different purposes. Most popular are evergreen bushes, which provide a green foliage throughout the year. Then there are deciduous shrubs and bushes which provide a great fall foliage, which makes them popular among cultivars. Then there are everyone’s favorite the flowering plant bushes, which produce beautiful blooms of various colors during the spring and fill up the garden with beautiful fragrance.

Certain flowering bushes, produce cherries throughout a season, which adds up to their value. Also, some people like to plant tree shrubs in their landscapes. If you want to learn how to distinguish between these shrubs and bushes, then here are various shrubs and bushes identification info and tips that will help.

Identification of Shrubs and Bushes

Carrying a hand book, some pencils, a camera and importantly a good horticulture guidebook with you, can greatly help while trying to identify the various shrubs and bushes. This way you can take pictures, carry leaves of certain bushes for identification, and study these species of plants at home.

Here are some information of the common shrubs and bushes, which you can refer to for identifying shrubs and bushes.

White Butterfly Bush

Scientific Name: Buddleja davidii ‘Alba’

This bush grows 5 feet tall and 5 feet wide. It shows panicles of fragrant white flowers that have orange ends on the branches from the mid summer till the mid of fall. It has grayish green foliage throughout the season, and has fuzzy narrow leaves. This bush attracts butterflies.

Purple Butterfly Bush

Scientific Name: Buddleja davidii

These bushes get beautiful purple blooms, and have dark gray-green leaves which are large. The flower heads are of 6-8″ with beautiful fragrance, these bushes attract butterflies, hummingbirds and other beneficial insects.

Red Twig Dogwood

Scientific Name: Cornus sanguinea

This bush grows to a height and width of 6-8 feet. It bears variegated leaves, which are greenish gray with a white edge, and has small white flowers which together form a flat cluster. The flowers then transform into berries which are white with hints of blue and green. During fall, it will get a rose or gold foliage.

Common White Lilac

Scientific Name: Syringa Vulgaris

Lilac bush is a beautiful and fragrant deciduous shrub, and can be used as a hedge. It gets white flowers in clusters and has dark green leaves which are heart-shaped.

Aphrodite Rose of Sharon

Scientific Name: Hibiscus syriacus

This is a deciduous shrub, which has a green foliage and long-lasting flowers which can be rosy-pink in color. It grows to a height of 10 feet tall and 6 feet wide. Its funnel-shaped blooms resemble tropical hibiscus plant.

Daphne Laurel

Scientific Name: Daphne laureola

This evergreen shrub forms a plant, which looks like a small tree of 2-4 feet tall. Its leaves are densely whorled near the top of the stem, and are very dark green, shiny and smooth. The twigs have a stout odor when they are cut, and the flowers are small and grow in clusters of 2-10.

Mountain Laurel

Scientific Name: Kalmia latifolia

For mountain laurel shrub identification, remember these attributes. This shrub is a broad leaf evergreen, which has deep green glossy leaves. During spring the shrub displays small pink and white flowers.

Boxwood

Scientific Name: Buxus

Boxwood shrubs are common bushes used for landscaping. They have tiny foliage and a dense texture, which makes it good as a landscape plant. It can be pruned into any desired shape.

Black Chokeberry

Scientific Name: Aronia melanocarpa

This is a woody shrub, which grows 3-6 feet high with the same width. This shrub gets shiny pendulous clusters of black berries, and has lustrous green leaves, and the flowers are white-pink in color, which grow in loose clusters.

Burning Bush

Scientific Name: Euonymus alatus

Burning bush is a hard to miss plant, as it gets bright red foliage during the autumn. It also bears reddish-orange berries during autumn. It can grow over 15 feet tall, and so needs to be pruned regularly.

Japanese Barberry

Scientific Name: Berberis thunbergii

This is a dense deciduous shrub, that has deeply grooved brown, spiny branches which have a single spine at each shoot note. The leaves of this shrub are oval-shaped and very small, and the flowers are pale yellow, which produce edible glossy bright red berries, that contain a single seed.

Red Rum Honeysuckle

Scientific Name: Lonicera maackii

This is a deciduous shrub which grows to a height of 8-12 inches. It produces lots of white flowers which mature to yellow followed by bright red fruits throughout the winter.

Common Spicebush

Scientific Name: Lindera benzoin

This is a 5-20 feet tall shrub which is a native to the laurel family. It has smooth-edged, oval and pointed alternate leaves which are oblong. It gets red berries, and when you crush the twigs or any part of this bush you will get a lemony-spicy smell.

Variegated Yucca

Scientific Name: Yucca filamentosa

This plant has greenish-blue leaves, which have white margins. During winter, the leaves get a tinge of pink. This evergreen shrub is slow-growing and forms massive tufts of foliage up to 30 inches, and it gets large white flowers which are edible.

Crape Myrtle

Scientific Name: Lagerstroemia

This is one of the longest blooming tree, which grows as short as 18 inches and as tall as 40 feet. It has smooth alternate leaves, and the flowers in summer are big showy cluster of pink, purple, lavender or red color. The fruits followed by the flowers are of brown or black color.

Redosier Dogwood

Scientific Name: Cornus sericea

This species of dogwood, is a deciduous shrub, which grows 1.5-4 m tall, and 3-5 m wide. Its branches and twigs are dark red, and the dark green leaves are opposite, and ovate to oblong shape. The flowers are small dull white, and appear in clusters, which are followed by white berries.

Hydrangea

Scientific Name: Hydrangea

These are beautiful flowering plants, which get white, blue, pink, etc. colors of flowers in attractive clusters. These are small shrubs, which have large pointed leaves and are dark green in colour.

Privet

Scientific Name: Ligustrum Vulgare

This plant makes excellent tall and sound barriers, and has thick foliage which is dark green. It is a fast growing plant, and gets tiny white flowers.

Viburnums

Scientific Name: Viburnum

There are many species of viburnum, and the foliage can be rounded, lance-shaped or toothed, it can be velvety smooth or rough in texture. The flowers of viburnum shrubs are mostly white or pink in color, and often are fragrant.

Leatherleaf Viburnum

Scientific Name: Viburnum rhytidophyllum

These are large shrubs which can reach 10 feet height, and spread 6 feet or more. They have leathery leaves which are dark lustrous green, and are fuzzy gray below. These leaves droop limply from the stems. During late spring clusters of tiny white flowers can be seen, which are followed by oval red berries.

Azaleas

Scientific Name: Rhododendron

These are flowering plants, which bloom in spring with big pinkish-white flowers. The plant has long bright green leaves, which are slender.

Identification of Evergreen Shrubs and Bushes

The above information shows various shrubs and bushes and their attributes. The first sign in evergreen shrub identification is that evergreen shrubs retain their leaves throughout the year. First scrutinize the leaves of the plant, conifers have needles or scales. Measure the length of the conifer needles, look at how many needles make a bundle. To check for angiosperms flowering plants, look at the configuration of the leaves along the branch. Check if they are paired oppositely, or alternate on the either side. Also, check the shape of the leaves and its origination from a single node. Is the shape of the leaf oblong, triangular, circular or lance like?

Rhododendron’s plant has more bulbous, darker and rubbery leaves. Also, checking the bark can give you some hint, such as mountain laurel has a reddish-brown trunk, while of odorless bayberry is pale or white, the texture of mountain laurel is scaly while that of bayberry is smooth. Checking height can also give you some clues. Looking at the reproductive features can also give you some hints, flowers and seeds are often flashy of evergreen shrubs and bushes.

Identification of Flowering Shrubs and Bushes

There are various types of flowering plants, here are some hints on guessing some of the popular flowering bushes. To identify butterfly bushes, check the butterflies flock. This is a small bush which has colorful flowers which bloom in cone shape flowers. Azaleas get vibrant clusters of flowers, and the foliage stays green all throughout the year. The flowers are tube like and come in variety of colors. Lilac bushes get fragrant purple, red or white colored flowers, which bloom during spring. The flowers are small in shape and bloom in clusters.

Tree Shrubs Identification

To identify tree shrubs you need time and experience, here are some tips that will help you to spot difference between deciduous and evergreen trees, shrubs and bushes. You can consider getting a horticulture guidebook, and look at the various tree shrubs and bushes pictures, to see if you can match the shrub in front of you with the one present in the guidebook. This will make the job of identifying different types of evergreen shrubs and deciduous shrubs easier.

Examine the leaves of the shrub, the deciduous shrubs lose their leaves during the fall, and many species can be identified due to their distinct leaf shape and color of the foliage. Evergreen trees leaves don’t change color, and can be of different shapes like star, elongated, oval or obtuse. Check out the flowers, many shrubs during spring produce variety of colors. Smell the leaves, certain trees have a specific scent like that of eucalyptus and cedar tree.

So, remember the above tips visit gardens, local nurseries, shrubs and bushes for sale stores, and other landscapes where you can see various types of shrubs and bushes, and look at them closely to identify them.


Plantago major Plantago major, or Plantain, is an herbaceous, flowering, perennial species of Plantago. It grows in lawns and fields, along roadsides, and in other areas that have been disturbed by humans. Plantain does particularly well in compacted or disturbed soils and can survive repeated trampling. Native Americans called it "white man's footprint" because it appeared and thrived in disturbed areas around European settlements. Its roots work to break up hardpan soil and can help stop erosion. Plaintain is wind-pollinated and each plant can produce 20,000 small oval-shaped orange to black bitter-tasting seeds. This is a common lawn weed that is able to resist mowing because of its low basal leaves. Plantain is not related to the fruit called plantain, which is a type of banana. Plantain is a highly nutritious wild edible, that is high in calcium and vitamins A, C, and K. The young, tender leaves can be eaten raw, and the older, stringier leaves can be boiled in stews and eaten. The seeds are also edible. However, ingesting large quantities can cause a drop in blood pressure. Diseases, Insects, and Other Plant Problems: No known diseases or insect problems. Whole plant Ekenitr CC BY-NC 2.0 Leaf Emilian Robert Vicol CC BY 2.0 Flower Prilfish CC BY 2.0 Seeds for all the way down the flower stalk. Carmona Rodriguez cc CC-BY-SA 2.0 Summer Blooming Shrubs

Gardenia

Gardenia ‘August Beauty’

Bloom Time: Late Spring to Early Summer
Zone: 7 to 9
Light: Full Sun to Part Shade
Size: 2′ to 8′ tall

Next up on my list of white flowering bushes is Gardenia.

I love the fragrance of Gardenias, which is why I have 2 of them growing in my garden–one by the front door, and one right beside the back patio.

That way anytime I leave the house, I walk right by them and can’t help but smell their perfume.

Spiraea

‘Bridal Wreath’ Spiraea

Bloom Time: Late Spring to Early Summer
Zone: 5 to 9
Light: Full Sun
Size: 1′ to 8′ tall

Spiraea is a versatile shrub that comes in many shapes, sizes and bloom colors, including white.

With its long arching branches that are covered in blooms, ‘Bridal Wreath’ Spiraea is still one of my favorites.

However, other varieties still put on a show and don’t take up as much room.

Roses

Hydrangea

Hydrangea paniculata

Bloom Time: Summer to Fall
Zones: 3 to 9
Light: Sun or Part Shade
Size: 3′ to 12′ tall and wide

The next bush with white flowers is a very popular garden shrub…Hydrangeas.

Hydrangeas have huge blooms that last for many weeks and don’t require much maintenance, so it’s easy to see why they’re everyone’s favorite.

It also has some varieties that do well in sun and some that are better in the shade, so you’re likely to find a Hydrangea that will work in your garden.

Butterfly Bush (Buddleia)

Butterfly Bush (Buddleia) ‘White Profusion’ ©EDEN – stock.adobe.com

Bloom Time: Summer to Fall
Zones: 5 to 10
Light: Full Sun
Size: 2′ to 8′ tall

As the name implies, Butterfly Bush is a white-flowering shrub that attracts butterflies. And I can vouch for the fact that the butterflies really do like this plant! During the summer, there’s always at least one flying around the flowers.

Butterfly bush is very easy to grow and produces long beautiful stems of flowers that are also available in blue, purple and pink.

One word of caution is that it can be invasive if it’s planted in an area that it really likes, so check with your local nursery to see if it might be a problem in your area.

Summersweet Clethra ( Clethra alnifolia)

Summersweet Clethera ‘Sixteen Candles’ ©Nicola Gordon – stock.adobe.com

Bloom Time: Fall
Zones: 4 to 9
Light: Sun to Shade
Size: 2′ to 8′ tall

Summersweet Clethra is a native shrub to the eastern United States that produces white spiky fragrant blooms in the summer or early fall.

Besides being easy to grow, it’s also great for attracting birds and butterflies to your garden. They love its flowers!

Summersweet Clethra does spread by runners so that’s something to be aware of when you’re planting it. You’ll need to prune it to keep it under control.


Common Chickweed

Chickweed is a winter annual that begins to sprout in the fall. It can easily establish in thin turf areas or dormant lawns. Chickweed will grow throughout the winter and begin seeding in the springsummer before dying. This plant can form dense mats of tiny egg-shaped leaves arranged in pairs opposite on the stem. The stem has a single line of hairs running along the leaf stem and main stem. Flowers form on the end of the stem and have five white petals.

Gallery 75 DF can be used in centipede and St. Augustine, as well as tall fescue, bermuda, and zoysia lawns as a preemergent. Your best bet to control of established chickweed is with the weed killer Southern Ag Lawn Weed Killer with Trimec. It’s safe for St. Augustine, centipede, bermuda, zoysia and tall fescue lawns.


Anthropogenic (man-made or disturbed habitats), meadows and fields

  • Connecticut
  • Maine
  • Massachusetts
  • New Hampshire
  • Rhode Island
  • Vermont
  • the leaf blade is lanceolate (lance-shaped widest below the middle and tapering at both ends)
  • the leaf blade is linear (very narrow with more or less parallel sides)
  • blue to purple
  • pink to red
  • white
  • the flowers grow out of the axil (point where a branch or leaf is attached to the main stem)
  • the inflorescence is a dichasial cyme (an axis with a terminal flower, below it a pair of branches, each with a terminal flower, these branches may in turn have a pair of branches and so on)
Clonal plantlets
Flowers
  • the flowers curve or droop downwards
  • the flowers point upward or spread or curve outward
  • blue to purple
  • pink to red
  • white
  • the flower is cup-shaped
  • the flower is flattened or platter-shaped
  • the style is knob-like at the tip, and unbranched
  • the style is narrow at the tip and unbranched
  • the flowers grow out of the axil (point where a branch or leaf is attached to the main stem)
  • the inflorescence is a dichasial cyme (an axis with a terminal flower, below it a pair of branches, each with a terminal flower, these branches may in turn have a pair of branches and so on)
  • NA
  • the spathe just wraps around the base of the spike of flowers
Fruits or seeds
Glands or sap
Growth form
Leaves
  • the underside of the leaf is fuzzy or hairy
  • the underside of the leaf is not hairy, or has very few hairs
  • the upper side of the leaf is fuzzy or hairy
  • the upper side of the leaf is not hairy, or has very few hairs
  • the leaf blade clasps the stem at the base, or the leaf blade goes all the way around the stem, so that the stem appears to pierce the leaf blade
  • the leaf has no stalk
  • the leaf blade is lanceolate (lance-shaped widest below the middle and tapering at both ends)
  • the leaf blade is linear (very narrow with more or less parallel sides)
Place
  • Connecticut
  • Maine
  • Massachusetts
  • New Hampshire
  • Rhode Island
  • Vermont
  • man-made or disturbed habitats
  • meadows or fields
Scent
Stem, shoot, branch

18 of 21

Liriope

Also called monkey grass or lilyturf, liriope is prized for its pretty mounding, grasslike foliage. An excellent groundcover, liriope thrives in sun or shade and helps control erosion on steep slopes. As a bonus, the plant sends up spikes of lavender, purple, or white flowers in late summer followed by bluish black, berrylike fruits. Liriope is not a true grass but a member of the lily family.

Name: Liriope spicata

Growing Conditions: Full sun to shade and well-drained soil


Common Spring Wildflowers in the Smokies

Spring Beauty

Photo courtesy of Leslie M. Weetman, PhD

There are over 1,500 kinds of flowering plants that grow in Great Smoky Mountains, more than in any other American national park. These are some of the wildflowers and flowering shrubs commonly seen in the park during the spring months:

Spring Beauty - Claytonia virginica

Spring beauty is an early spring wildflower. The blossom has 5 pink-striped petals that are white or a pale pink. The plant is only 3 to 4 inches tall, and has a pair of oval, dark green leaves halfway up the stem. Spring beauty is commonly seen over a wide range of the park.

Bloodroot - Sanguianaria canadensis

Bloodroot is an early spring wildflower. It has many narrow white petals surround a center of gold stamens. It also has veiny and deep-lobed leaves. The roots contain an orange-red sap, which gives the flower its common name. Bloodroot if frequently seen in the low elevations of the park.

Sharp-Lobed Hepatica

Photo courtesy of Leslie M. Weetman, PhD

Sharp-Lobed Hepatica - Hepatica nobilis

Sharp-lobed hepatica is an early spring wildflower. It has a single flower on a hairy stalk, with a cluster dark, pointed lobed leaves. Sharp-lobed hepatica is frequently seen in the mid to low elevations. Also found in the park is round-lobed hepatica (Hepatica americana) which has rounded leaf tips instead of pointed tip.

Smooth Solomon's Seal

Photo courtesy of Leslie M. Weetman, PhD

Smooth Solomon's Seal- Polygonatum biflorum

Smooth solomon's seal flowers hang down below the hairless stem and area easily hidden by the leaves. Smooth solomon's seal is commonly seen in the mid to low elevations.

False Solomon's Seal

False Solomon's Seal- Maianthemum racemosum

False solomon's seal is a late spring wildflower. The white flowers and fruit are clustered at the end of the plant. False solomon's seal is frequently seen over a wide range of the park.

Photo courtesy of Leslie M. Weetman, PhD

Foamflower- Tiarella cordifolia

Foamflower is easily recognized by the delicate spike of white flowers on a leafless stem. The leaves resemble maple leaves on long, hairy stems. Foamflower is commonly seen over a wide range of the park.

Galax- Galax sp.

Galax is a tall pillar of tiny white flowers surrounded by evergreen leaves. The leaves turn copper-red in the winter. Galax is only found in the southern Appalachians and is commonly found over a wide range of the park.

Photo courtesy of Leslie M. Weetman, PhD

Bishop's Cap- Mitella diphylla

Bishop's cap has very small white flowers that resemble a tiny-fringed bell under a magnifying lens on the upper half of the stem. It has a single pair of opposite leaves halfway up the stalk and leaves at the base of the plant that resemble maple leaves. Bishop's cap is frequently seen in the mid to low elevations of the park.

White Trilliums

White Trillium - Trillium graniflorum

White trillium has a large bell-shaped flower, with three white leaves around a yellow center. The white leaves turn pink with age. White trillium is commonly seen in the mid to low elevations of the park.

Catesby's Trillium

Photo courtesy of Leslie M. Weetman, PhD

Catesby's Trillium - Trillium catesbaei

Catesby's trillium is an early spring wildflower that is only found in the Southern Appalachians. The flower hangs down from the stalk and has three white leaves that turn pink with age. Catesby's trillium is frequently seen in the mid to low elevations of the park.

Painted Trillium

Painted Trillium - Trillium undulatum

Painted trillium has three white leaves around a yellow center. Each of the leaves looks to have a maroon "v" painted on it. Painted trillium is occasionally seen in the higher elevations of the park.

Vasey's Trillium

Photo courtesy of Leslie M. Weetman, PhD

Vasey's Trillium - Trillium vaseyi

Vasey's trillium is the latest blooming trillium, and has a red flower with three leaves, three sepals and three petals. Vasey's trillium is frequently seen in mid to low elevations.

Yellow Trillium

Photo courtesy of Leslie M. Weetman, PhD

Yellow Trillium- Trillium luteum

Yellow trillium has a single yellow flower with narrow and erect petals. It has three leaves, three petals, and three sepals. It is frequently seen in the lower elevations of the park.

Halberd-Leaved Violet

Halberd-Leaved Violets - Viola hasata

Halberd-leaved violet is an early spring wildflower. It is easily identified by its leaves that are shaped like arrowheads. It has small yellow flowers clustered near the top of the stem. Halberd-leaved violets are commonly seen in the mid to low elevations of the park.

Photo courtesy of Leslie M. Weetman, PhD

Trout-Lily - Erythronium umbilicatum

The Cherokee Indians believed that when the trout lily bloomed it was time to fish. The leaves look like a brook trout with the spots or blotches on them. The trout-lily is 6 to 8 inches tall, and is a yellow, solitary drooping flower. Trout-lily is commonly seen throughout the park.

Robin's Plantain

Photo courtesy of Leslie M. Weetman, PhD

Robin's Plantain - Erigeron pulchellus

Robin's plantain is a daisy-like flower with very narrow light outer petals and small yellow inner petals on a small disk. Robin's plantain are frequently seen in the low elevations of the park.

Wild Strawberry

Photo courtesy of Leslie M. Weetman, PhD

Wild Strawberry - Fragaria virginiana

Wild strawberries are a spring wildflower, with fruit appearing later in the summer. This is a low growing plant with very small white flowers. Wild strawberries are frequently seen throughout the park, and the strawberry fruit is one of the favorite summer foods for black bears.

Fire Pink- Silene virginica

Fire pink is a spring wildflower. The name "pink" does not refer to the color of the flower, but that each of the five petals are pinked or notched at the tip. It is a red flower with five petals that is on a slender stem with a pair of slender, opposite leaves. Fire pink is commonly seen throughout the park.

Columbine - Aquilegia canadensis

Columbines have delicate red and yellow flowers that hang down from a slender stalk. Columbines are frequently seen in the mid to low elevations of the park.

Crested Dwarf Iris

Crested Dwarf Iris - Iris cristata

Crested dwarf iris has three blue-purple above three unique petal-like sepals. On each sepal is a yellow crest. Crested dwarf iris is commonly seen in the mid to low elevations of the park.

Wild Geranium

Photo courtesy of Leslie M. Weetman, PhD

Wild Geranium - Geranium maculatum

Wild geranium has 5 petals on each blossom that stand 12 to 18 inches and are bright pink and purple. Wild geranium is commonly found in the mid to low elevations of the park.

White Fringed Phacelia

Photo courtesy of Leslie M. Weetman, PhD

White Fringed Phacelia- Phacelia fimbriata

White fringed phacelia is often found massing over large areas that look like patches snow. Each individual flower has five white petals that resemble a cup-shaped wildflower. The petals turn purple with age. White fringed phacelia is commonly seen in the mid to high elevations of the park.

Purple Phacelia

Purple Phacelia- Phacelia bipinnatifida

Purple phacelia is the tallest phacelia in the park and has purple-blue flowers on hairy stems. It has leaves that are divided into segments and then lobed. Purple phacelia is occasionally seen in the mid to low elevations of the park.

Showy Orchis

Showy Orchis- Gelaris spectabilis

Showy orchis are usually have two long and egg-shaped basal leaves with the flowering stalk itself having no leaves. Each flower has a pink or lilac hood with a white lip. Showy orchis are commonly seen in the mid to low elevations of the park.

Dutchman Britches

Photo courtesy of Leslie M. Weetman, PhD

Dutchman's Britches - Dicentra cucullaria

Dutchman's britches look like a pair of pantaloons hanging on the line to dry. It is a white, nodding flower on a leafless stalk that hangs over dissected leaves. It is often confused with squirrel corn (Dicentra canadensis) which blooms at the same time in the same habitat. Dutchman's britches are commonly seen over a wide range of the park.

Squirrel Corn

Photo courtesy of Leslie M. Weetman, PhD

Squirrel corn- Dicentra canadensis

Squirrel corn has white, nodding flowers, small yellow tubers and compound leaves. It is often confused with dutchman's britches (Dicentra cucullaria), which blooms at the same time in the same habitat. Squirrel corn is frequently seen over a wide range of the park.

Bleeding Heart

Photo courtesy of Leslie M. Weetman, PhD

Bleeding Heart- Dicentra eximia

Bleeding heart is the pink version of the squirrel corn (Dicentra canadensis) It has four pink petals that look heart-shaped over a cluster of delicately cut basal leaves. It is occasionally seen in the mid to low elevations.

Photo courtesy of Leslie M. Weetman, PhD

Blue Phlox- Phlox divaricate

Blue phlox is a blue or purple flower that has five notched petals that radiate from a very narrow tube. It is occasionally seen in the mid to low elevations of the park.

Thyme- Leaved Bluets

Photo Courtesy of Leslie M. Weetman, PhD

Thyme-Leaved Bluets- Houstonia serpyllifolia

Thyme- leaved bluets are a late spring wildflower. They are a tiny flower with four blue petals surrounding a central yellow spot. Often, the flowers are seen in a group. Thyme- leaved bluets are commonly seen throughout the park.

Jack-in-the-Pulpit Wildflower

Jack-in-the-Pulpit - Arisaema triphyllum

Jack-in-the-Pulpit is a unique early spring wildflower. It has a "Jack" standing erect at his pulpit. At the base of "jack" is a cluster of tiny flowers and a piece of the flower is green or dark purple forms the pulpit by curving over to provide a canopy. Jack-in-the-Pulpit is commonly seen throughout the park.

Wild Ginger

Wild Ginger- Asarum canadense

Wild ginger has heart shaped leaves that hide a small, three lobed brown flower. The plant's odor attracts female fungus gnats into the blossom to lay their eggs, and pollen is exchanged among plants as the gnat goes between plants. Wild ginger is commonly seen in the mid to low elevations of the park.

Photo courtesy of Leslie M. Weetman, PhD

Squawroot- Conopholis americana

Sqauwroot resembles an ear of corn coming out of the leaf-litter. It is a brown flower because there is no chlorophyll in it. Squawroot is actually a parasite, growing on oak roots. Black bears are known to feed on squawroot. It is frequently seen in the lower elevations of the park.

Photo courtesy of Leslie M. Weetman, PhD

Flame Azalea - Rhododendron calendulaceum

Flame azalea is a spring flowering deciduous shrub that blooms at low elevations in April and at high elevations in June and July. The leaves and flowers are concentrated at the end of the branch, and the flowers are red and yellow. Flame azalea is commonly seen throughout the park.

Recommended Reading

Photos of wildflowers grouped by color will aid in identifying species found in the park. Includes information on suggested walks, hikes, and drives in the park, as well as wildflower conservation.


Cephalocereus comes from the Greek word “kephale,” which means “head,” and the Latin work “cereus,” which means “candle.” Senilis is Latin for “aged” or “old.” The white hairs covering this cactus are thought to provide several benefits. The light color reflects heat away from the plant’s trunk and helps keep it cooler by trapping a layer of air between the spines and trunk. The air layer also provides insulation from cold in winter.

Old man cactus needs fast-draining soil and full sun. In pots, use a cactus potting mix or add equal parts perlite, pumice or coarse sand to regular potting soil. The plant thrives in slightly alkaline soil, so a handful of calcium added at planting time also is beneficial. Water only when the soil has become completely dry, soaking the pot thoroughly. Outdoors, mix sand or grit with equal parts native soil and compost to improve drainage. Old man cactus requires very little fertilizer. Use a balanced, water-soluble fertilizer once or twice a year, between April and October, diluting it by half its recommended dose.


Preventive Tips

Weed control is part of every successful lawn maintenance plan. Here are some steps you can take to ensure that your grass stays as weed-free as possible.

Mow higher and as needed. Frequent mowing weakens grass and exposes the soil so weed seeds can germinate. Grass blades, when cut often, won’t develop the side shoots required to create a denser lawn. Mow frequently enough to maintain a lawn height of 3 to 4 inches.

Water infrequently, but deeply. Lawns require about an inch of water per week. Any more than that and you’re inviting disease. Water deeply to promote a stronger root system and only when there’s been insufficient rainfall. A rain gauge positioned in the landscape can help you determine weekly precipitation.

Pull weeds when soil is damp. Hard soil is reluctant to release weeds. Wait a day or two after rainfall to do some hand-pulling or digging.

Never allow weeds to go to seed. A weed flower is a sure sign that the plant is preparing to set seed. Cut it down to prevent it from spreading.

Dig only when necessary. Thousands of weed seeds sit just below the surface of the soil, waiting to be kissed by the sun. The more you disrupt soil in your beds and lawn, the more you increase the likelihood that seeds will germinate.

Mulch landscape beds. Mulch stops the germination of weed seeds by preventing sunlight from reaching them.

Fertilize appropriately. Apply the right amount at the right time, according to the instructions on the option you choose, to grow a healthy, weed-free lawn.


Watch the video: Λευκό σετ λαδόπανα Lina Baby με λουλούδι (August 2022).