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1.4.16.6: Evolution of Amniotes - Biology

1.4.16.6: Evolution of Amniotes - Biology


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Learning Outcomes

  • Discuss the evolution of amniotes

The first amniotes evolved from amphibian ancestors approximately 340 million years ago during the Carboniferous period. Synapsids include all mammals, including extinct mammalian species. Sauropsids include reptiles and birds, and can be further divided into anapsids and diapsids. The key differences between the synapsids, anapsids, and diapsids are the structures of the skull and the number of temporal fenestrae behind each eye (Figure 1).

Temporal fenestrae are post-orbital openings in the skull that allow muscles to expand and lengthen. Anapsids have no temporal fenestrae, synapsids have one, and diapsids have two. Anapsids include extinct organisms and may, based on anatomy, include turtles. However, this is still controversial, and turtles are sometimes classified as diapsids based on molecular evidence. The diapsids include birds and all other living and extinct reptiles.

The diapsids diverged into two groups, the Archosauromorpha (“ancient lizard form”) and the Lepidosauromorpha (“scaly lizard form”) during the Mesozoic period (Figure 2). The lepidosaurs include modern lizards, snakes, and tuataras. The archosaurs include modern crocodiles and alligators, and the extinct pterosaurs (“winged lizard”) and dinosaurs (“terrible lizard”). Clade Dinosauria includes birds, which evolved from a branch of dinosaurs.

Practice Question

Members of the order Testudines have an anapsid-like skull with one opening. However, molecular studies indicate that turtles descended from a diapsid ancestor. Why might this be the case?

[practice-area rows=”2″][/practice-area]
[reveal-answer q=”540837″]Show Answer[/reveal-answer]
[hidden-answer a=”540837″]The ancestor of modern Testudines may at one time have had a second opening in the skull, but over time this might have been lost.[/hidden-answer]


Watch the video: the amnoites (June 2022).